Wednesday, September 24, 2014

'I first became a scientist in my backyard'

That’s me, climbing a flagpole just outside my house when I was about seven years old, circa 1967. The rest of my family was standing below watching, cheering me on, and documenting the event. Little did I know at the time that other kids were told they couldn’t climb flagpoles, let alone make it to the top. Yes, that’s a metaphor.

By Anthony Martin

Emory paleontologist Anthony Martin wrote a moving, personal piece about his path from poverty to a PhD for his blog "Life Traces of the Georgia Coast." Below is an excerpt from Martin's article:

"I first became a scientist in my backyard. This path to life-long inquiry began when I was four years old, as soon as my family moved to a larger house, and one with a larger yard. This small, outdoor patch of land with a few large trees, bushes, and grass soon became my field area, laboratory, classroom, and all-purpose place for conducting experiments in nature. Even better, my proclivity for observing this world outside of myself was encouraged – or at least tolerated – by my mother and father.

"At the time, I had no idea just how important of a role this backyard and parental support would play in my scientific career. Yet now I look back on it with a mix of gratitude and wistfulness, especially as both of my parents have departed this earth I have studied for most of my life. ...

"For about nine months of any given year during my childhood, starting in the spring, I could step out the back door of my house and watch ants, bees, wasps, butterflies, moths, spiders, and praying mantises. Plant-insect interactions in particular – such as pollination, herbivory, and wound responses in plants – drew me in, teaching me those ecological principles long before I ever heard the words 'pollination,' 'herbivory, and 'wound response.'"

Read the whole article on "Life Traces of the Georgia Coast." It's an amazing story.

Bringing to life "Dinosaurs Without Bones"

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